Tags: workers’ comp

How to Manage Job Stress for a Healthier Life

How to Manage Job Stress for a Healthier Life

Job stress is a fact of life. Whether you love your job or aren’t so happy with it, all jobs create some degree of stress, at least periodically. While it’s rarely possible to eliminate job stress completely, there are many things you can do to help reduce and manage the amount of stress you deal with every day on the job. Unmanaged job stress is a common health complaint, and work is often ranked as a higher stressor than financial troubles and family problems, according to the National Institute of... Read More

Workers’ Compensation in Colorado: What You Need to Know

Workers' Compensation in Colorado What You Need to Know

Workers’ Compensation insurance is an insurance system that provides medical benefits and monetary compensation to assist employees who become injured or ill as a result of their jobs. The Workers’ Compensation Act of Colorado (WCAC) defines employer responsibilities for the state’s workers’ compensation program. Compliance with this act is monitored by the Division of Workers’ Compensation (DWC), part of the Colorado Department of Labor and Employment. One of the purposes of the workers’ compensation system is to reduce the risk of litigation when work-related injuries and illnesses result in employee... Read More

Workplace Safety Needs to Address More than Accidents

Workplace Safety Needs to Address More than Accidents

Workplace injuries are a significant risk for any business. They can lead to lost productivity, costly medical bills and increased insurance premiums. While most businesses have protocols and programs in place to help reduce workplace accidents, but there is another type of workplace injury that may be just as costly as accidents, if not addressed. Work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs) are not injuries caused by accidents, but instead from job conditions or activities that lead to or contribute to these conditions. Workplace safety programs need to address more than accidents and... Read More

How to Work Safely in Cold Weather

How to Work Safely in Cold Weather

Winter has officially arrived in Colorado and with it, freezing temperatures and snow. Winter weather brings with it significant health risks, especially for those who may need to work outdoors in cold weather. Among those risks are hypothermia, frostbite, dehydration and muscle injuries. Frigid temperatures can also cause additional pain for those who suffer from arthritis and rheumatism. To prevent injuries and illness as a result of winter weather, it’s important to learn about the causes, symptoms and safety considerations to take so you are prepared to handle winter’s worst.... Read More

What to do First When a Worker is Injured

What to Do First When A Worker is Injured

When one of your employees is injured, it sets in motion a sequence of events that can last for weeks or even months. But no matter how prolonged the recovery period, the first 24 hours after an injury are the most crucial. To respond effectively to an incident, the majority of the action items should occur within 24 hours.It is essential that both you and your staff know what to do first when a worker is injured. Your supervisors may already be experienced in handling injuries. Still, a clearly defined... Read More

How to Protect Yourself from Workplace Eye Injuries

How to Protect Yourself from Workplace Eye Injuries

Your eyes, and their health, are critical to your success at work, and to your ability to fully enjoy life independently. According to Prevent Blindness America, more than 300,000 eye injuries occur each year in the workplace. Of these injuries, 10 percent result in missed days of work and of those injuries, 10 to 20 percent will cause temporary or permanent blindness. OSHA estimates that 90 percent of such injuries could be prevented by wearing the proper protective eyewear. Even minor eye injuries can cause vision problems that last a... Read More

How to Save on Work Comp Costs with a Safety Program

How to Save on Work Comp Costs with a Safety Program

Work comp costs can be one of the highest insurance costs in any business. There are many ways to save on work comp costs but one of the best and most effective ways is to reduce work injuries. And one of the best ways to reduce injuries is to create a company culture of safety by implementing a company safety program. With help from safety programs, you can save your company money, improve productivity and increase employee morale on the road. Here’s how. According to the Occupational Safety and Health... Read More

How to Avoid Work Injuries at the Office

How to Avoid Work Injuries at the Office

Work-related injuries aren’t just limited to workers in clearly hazardous jobs. In fact, of the 10 most common work-related injuries seven of them can happen in virtually any kind of work setting. Do you ever see a utility worker on top of a telephone pole or a construction worker balancing on a steel beam high above you, and think that you could never work in such hazardous conditions? While those workers do have more dangerous jobs than you, they may actually be safer than you are in the office. This... Read More

How to Control Work Comp Costs Through Successful Premium Audits

How to Control Work Comp Costs Through Successful Premium Audits

Work Comp can be one of the most expensive and most frustrating of insurance costs for small business owners. There are many ways to control work comp costs, and many insurers and safety experts provide safety training and resources to help reduce injuries. There is another way to control your work comp costs, though, that isn’t talked about as much. And that is to make sure that you’re not paying too much for your coverage to begin with. Besides finding the right work comp insurance company, you also need to... Read More

Serious Workplace Injuries: When Are You Required to Report to OSHA?

Serious Workplace Injuries: When Are You Required to Report to OSHA?

Serious workplace injuries can be complicated. When an employee is seriously injured—or worse–on the job, our priority is usually providing the medical attention they need, reassuring and dealing with other employees and notifying family members when necessary. Making an OSHA report isn’t usually the first thing that comes to mind. The Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 (OSH Act) requires covered employers to report certain work-related injuries and illnesses to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). OSHA is a part of the U.S. Department of Labor and is... Read More